Dealing with the Emotional Stress of Moving into a New Home

After a long journey of dreaming, searching, and preparing, you’ve finally closed on your new home, and are officially a homeowner.
 
Congratulations!
 
But even though there’s a lot of excitement about this special day arriving, it’s often mixed with another feeling—the stress of now having to move in. 
 
Don’t worry, you’re not the only one. According to Money Under 30, along with saving money for a down payment and finding the right neighborhood, moving is one of the most stressful experiences in the homebuying process. This is in part because, while other steps of becoming a homeowner are more about checking off a box, moving is about changing your life. 

Americans and Stress 

People have a lot of other stressors in life, beyond moving into a new home. A recent New York Times article cites that Americans are reporting the highest levels of stress, anger, and worry in a decade, with 55 percent of U.S. adults feeling stress during “a lot of the day,” compared to 35 percent worldwide.
 
With these statistics, it’s not hard to imagine how the anxiety of moving can add to an already heightened level of everyday stress. But while the disruption of moving isn’t going to change, there are practical steps you can take to ward off any unnecessary anxiety. Learn more about the potentially stress-inducing parts of the moving process to look out for, and how to make the transition as smooth as possible.  

10 Common Stress Factors of Moving

Even though it is the last leg of the homebuying journey, moving can be the most stressful part of the process. And, considering the fact that a person in the U.S. will move an average of 11.4 times in their lifetime, it’s no wonder why Americans are among the most stressed people in the world. But why is moving so stressful? Here are just a few reasons why people suffer from moving anxiety:

  1. You get hit with moving-day expenses. From renting a moving truck to disassembling furniture, the costs of transporting your things from one home to the next can add up, especially after you’ve just put down a new home payment. 

  2. You have to find good movers. Even the idea of trusting strangers with your personal items can cause anxiety, let alone finding the right movers for the job.

  3. You have to transfer all your utilities. Switching your utilities at the right time—without incurring unforeseen fees—can be difficult when you’re in between residences, and keeping everything in order can bring on a lot of anxiety.

  4. You have to change your address. Needing to inform not only your friends, but also paid services, subscriptions, and accounts of your new address can be a source of anxiety as you try to remember everything that needs to be updated.

  5. You have to get out of your current place quickly. Sometimes, getting everything packed and out of your old place and situated in your new one can take longer than expected, causing stress when you feel like the clock’s ticking.

  6. You have to decide what you’re not bringing with you. While you know purging your clothes and other belongings will make the move easier, trying to figure out what’s worth keeping and what should be discarded can be a stressful and even emotional experience.

  7. You can’t access what you need. All of your things have been put away in boxes, making simple tasks tricky when most of your essentials are out of reach. Trying to fry an egg when you realize your pans are already packed is the last thing you want to have to worry about. 

  8. You have to prep your new home for move-in day. From lining kitchen cabinets to steaming the carpets, getting your new home ready for all your stuff can be one of the most stressful moving tasks.

  9. You have to move your whole family. Packing, moving, and unpacking with kids can be a whole separate story when it comes to your stress level and making sure everything is being accounted for.

  10. You’re starting a new chapter in life. As exciting as a new home can be, there’s always an adjustment period that can take time as you acclimate to a new way of life.

The Big Day is Here: Tips to Avoid Moving Anxiety

Luckily, a little preparation can help curb most of these moving-related woes, as a lot of the anxiety comes from not knowing what to expect or the best ways to approach each situation. To help you out, we’ve put together the following guide with tips for managing the move-in process with ease. 

 
Infographic outlining how to avoid stress when moving into a new home
 

Making Your Moving Process Easier and Less Stressful

At Shea, we know that the journey to homeownership can be filled with ups and downs, and we want to make it as easy and stress-free as possible, from the start. That’s why we developed our Find Your Home search, so you can easily look for the perfect home, and created a robust Resource Guide with all the tools you’ll need throughout the homebuying process, including:

  • The Homebuying Experience—expert guides and checklists designed to help the first-time buyer through the new home experience.

  • Securing a Mortgage—important information for understanding mortgages and how to find the right home loan for you.

  • Homebuying Glossary—a handy list of all the terms you need to know to navigate the homebuying process with confidence.

 

How to Find the Right Partner to Relieve Your Anxiety about Moving

At Shea Homes, we’re committed to helping you throughout the homebuying experience, so you can feel confident and at ease before, during, and well after you move in. Contact us if you’d like to chat with a New Home Advisor, or sign up for our email list below for more helpful content about moving day and beyond. Ready to find your dream home? Start your search today. 

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